Aquaculture in Idaho – Aquaculture Magazine
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Aquaculture in Idaho

Water flows out of the ground and directly into the hatchery May 3 at Clear Spring Foods in Buhl.

  • The pristine water does not need to be filtered or altered before entering the hatchery because it is already perfect for raising rainbow trout. Randy Macmillan, vice president of research and environmental affairs, says access to a resource as valuable as the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer is completely unique. He is not aware of a similar source anywhere else in the world.
  • Manager Dirk Bogaard walks between April 26 at the Hagerman Trout Farm in Hagerman. Idaho Trout Company currently produces between 500,000 and 600,000 fish a year, a stark decrease from the 10 million fish a year that they used to produce.
  • A tiger muskie swims in the viewing pond May 2 at the Hagerman Fish Hatchery in Hagerman. Manager Joe Chapman says the tiger muskie program started about five years ago. Idaho Fish and Game stocks the muskies throughout the state not only as trophy fish but also as a form of biological control. By stocking muskies in high-mountain lakes with stunted populations of brook trout, the muskies will help control the population so the trout don’t have as much competition for food. ‘It’s been a very successful program,’ Chapman said.
  • Fingerling rainbow trout flop along a grate and down a chute into a transport truck delivering to the Little Camas Reservoir on May 2 at the Hagerman Fish Hatchery in Hagerman. This year the state hatcheries plan to stock 16,949,304 fish in bodies of water across the state.
  • Fish Transport culturist Mike Fairchild takes a dissolved oxygen reading of the water in his transport truck that is delivering to the Little Camas Reservoir on May 2 at the Hagerman Fish Hatchery in Hagerman. ‘The biggest thing I’ve got working against me right now is time,’ he said. The hatchery lowers the temperature of the water to slow down the metabolism of the fish, making them easier to transport.
  • Sierrah Black, a seventh grade student at Murtaugh Middle School, smiles as she prepares to unhook the fish she caught May 2 at the Hagerman Fish Hatchery in Hagerman. Black’s class was participating in the Trout in the Classroom Program. The class was given fish eggs to hatch and raise. After a few months the students visited that hatchery to release their hatched eggs, tour the facility and learn how to catch, fillet and fry a fish.
    Steam rises off of the raceways Wednesday, May 2, 2018, at the Hagerman Fish Hatchery in Hagerman.
  • Assistant Manager Dan Anta monitors fish as they’re loaded onto a transport truck Wednesday, May 2, 2018, at the Hagerman Fish Hatchery in Hagerman.
  • Fingerling rainbow trout flop along a great and down a chute into a transport truck Wednesday, May 2, 2018, at the Hagerman Fish Hatchery in Hagerman.
  • Fish Transport Culturist Mike Fairchild transports fish to the Little Camas Reservoir on Wednesday, May 2, 2018, at the Hagerman Fish Hatchery in Hagerman.
    Souce: http://magicvalley.com/news/local/photos-aquaculture-in-idaho/collection_8b98af5d-c685-57a6-b348-b6d2903cdf30.html#14

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