Aquaculture Magazine

Aquaculture show heads to Croatia

The freshwater farming segment primarily produces common carp and rainbow trout, representing more than 50 per cent and about 30 per cent, respectively, of the total freshwater production of 4,800 tonnes.

Croatia: THE European aquaculture community will gather in Dubrovnik in October for one of the highlights in the industry’s calendar.

This year, the European Aquaculture Society (EAS) is heading to the Croatian city for its annual conference, following the success of its 40th anniversary event in Edinburgh last autumn.

One of the factors that may contribute to growth stagnation in aquaculture is the lack of cooperation between operators in the sector, says the EAS.

This may be in production (breeding programmes, feed resources, benchmarking technical performance, and so on), promotion and market intelligence, or training and knowledge management, including open access publications.

Turning policy into growth can be achieved by greater regional cooperation, task forces, public/private partnerships and other initiatives that help to reduce conflicts.

The theme of AE2017 is Cooperation for Growth, and this will be addressed through various sessions during the four-day conference, as well as in the international trade show and industry forums.

In its first planning meetings, the AE2017 programme co-chairs Snjezana Zrncic (Croatian Veterinary Institute) and Constantinos Mylonas (HCMR, Greece) proposed a list of parallel sessions, now available for online abstract submission (http://www.aquaeas.eu/39-uncategorised/365-ae2017-sessions).

Abstracts should be submitted before May 1 to have a ‘first review’ chance by the session moderators for acceptance. Abstracts submitted after the deadline will still be processed.

Space at the AE2017 international trade exhibition is still available.

The industry forums are being developed and will include the EAS-EATiP Day, and forums covering developments in bluefin tuna and in European flat oysters, for example.

Most people think Croatian aquaculture is based on sea bass and sea bream. With its long and beautiful coastline, this is indeed true and these species made up about two thirds of the total marine production of 12,000 tonnes in 2015.

But more than 2,500 tonnes of Atlantic bluefin tuna, small volumes of dentex, meagre and turbot and 800 tonnes of shellfish (Mediterranean mussels and European flat oysters) were also produced last year.

The freshwater farming segment primarily produces common carp and rainbow trout, representing more than 50 per cent and about 30 per cent, respectively, of the total freshwater production of 4,800 tonnes.

AE2017 will be held at the Valamar resort in Dubrovnik, Croatia, from October 17 to 20, 2017.

Source: http://www.fishupdate.com/aquaculture-show-heads-to-croatia/

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